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Bio Resin
 

Bio Resin

Bio Surfboard Resin
You can’t surf a foam blank. Modern surfboards are fragile at their core and require a protective shell to shield them against the harsh physical abuse of surfing. Simply put, a surfboard would not be a surfboard without resin and fiberglass—unless, of course, it was made from wood or plastic.

Most believe that the early Polynesians invented surfing and brought the sport to Hawaii. I personally believe it was the Norwegian Vikings, not the Hawaiians, who were the first surfers. You can’t tell me that those Norsemen didn’t try to surf at some point while traversing the coasts of Europe, Asia and the North Atlantic islands.

The Vikings were hardcore, and I bet they were also the original tow-in crews, using their seagoing clinker-build vessels to pull in fellow Vikes into those hidden Scandinavian pits. Did you know the word “knarr” is the Norse term for ships that were built for Atlantic voyages? I’d venture to suggest that the word “knarrly” or “gnarly” had its roots in the early Viking lexicon and is further proof of this theory. Anyway, let’s get back to the Hawaiians.

Those early Hawaiian boards were made of wood. In 1949 Bob Simmons designed and built the first styrofoam core boards, using plywood veneers and sealed with resin. Then in 1958 Hobie Alter took that original Bob Simmons design one step further, producing boards with polyurethane foam cores while utilizing fiberglassing techniques using polyester resins to form the outer shell of the surfboard.

That brings us to the point of this article, historically speaking at least.

Most surfboards have three resin layers that cover the foam core; the laminate coat, the hot coat, and lastly, the gloss coat. The majority of surfboards today are built with polyester resin and fiberglass cloth.

Glassers at FCD Surfboards working on the last stages of multiple boards at once.
Glassing Surfboards with Bio Resin

Wikipedia defines polyester resin as “unsaturated resins formed by the reaction of dibasic organic acids and polyhydric alcohols.”

Polyester resin is the cheapest resin available in the industry and yet offers the poorest adhesion, has the highest water absorption, highest shrinkage, and releases a high level of volatile organic compounds or VOCs. (This article is sounding like a chemistry class.)

VOCs are organic chemicals that have a high vapor pressure at room-temperature conditions. Ever walked into a glasser’s shop or repaired your board at home? That smell is your evidence of VOCs; don’t breathe in too deeply. It’s the VOCs that you need to watch out for.

High exposure to VOCs is not a good thing and can cause all kinds of health issues and environmental problems. I don’t support the doom and gloom approach, but long-term exposure to VOCs can lead to gnarly illnesses, like cancer. Epoxy: The word alone sounds a little sexy, and when you hear it you should pay attention because it’s a better alternative to polyester resin.

Nick Cooper of Coop Deville Surfboards glasses many of his EPS epoxy boards with a resin tint..
Eps Expoxy Resin
Epoxy is high-strength glue that is far superior to the majority of paste glues available on the market. Its full name is polyepoxide as it is formed by the reaction of polyamine and epoxide. The epoxide is the resin base of the reaction, while the polyamine is the hardening substance.

When combined, these compounds bond together on a chemical level in a criss-crossed fashion that makes the resulting substance strong. This reaction takes some time to develop and is normally called the curing of the resin.

Depending on how thinly the two substances are poured, and the mix of hardeners and resins, the curing time can vary. In some cases, heat can be applied to speed up the drying time, but normally it is cured only with time.

Epoxy is lighter, stronger and emits significantly less VOCs than polyester. Sounds good, right? Epoxy also allows for more flex strength than polyester, which means that your board can withstand greater punishment from the lip.

The thing is, epoxy resin is more expensive than polyester and tougher to work with, so the masses gravitate toward the cheaper and easier alternative.

Gerry Lopez and Fletcher Chouinard collaborating in the shaping bay.
Garry Lopez
So what’s better than epoxy resin? Bio-based resin, the ecological alternative.

Oddly enough bio resins have been around for several decades and have gone pretty much unnoticed except by those few people unable to tolerate the smell of commonly used petroleum-based resins or the random experimental hippie.

Well, it’s safe to say those days are over now, and pretty much everyone has become a guardian to the environment in one way or another. I ventured out and asked a few resin gurus about bio resin, and they came back with some interesting nuggets of eco-knowledge.

First to respond was Tony Gowen from Phix Doctor. I have known Gowen for a few years now because Wave Tribe distributes his eco ding repair kit, something I have used myself and highly recommend. According to Gowen, using bio resin has environmental advantages because “bio-based resin is sourced from plants, a renewable resource that reduces the need for petroleum in the manufacturing process. The Phix Doctor formula is free of toxic compounds and emits nearly zero carbon particles during the curing process.”

Chad Jackson of Kaimanu Surfboards has started shaping his own Bamboo boards using bio resin.
I like the idea of nearly zero VOCs, which made me wonder about other bio-based resin. So I called Desi Benatao over at Entrophy resins and found out their bio resins are an epoxy-based polymer that is partially derived from pine trees and vegetable oils.
When asked about the environmental advantages of bio resin, Benatao answered, “we’ve really tried to break this down so that in the end consumers can understand it, and in our minds, the one environmental issue we can all relate to is global warming. We’ve done an extensive study using life cycle analysis models and the key figure from that work is that our resins have about 50 percent of the carbon footprint of conventional petroleum derived resins. Using this data we are in the process of getting third party certification for carbon footprint savings as well as environmental preferability.”

So, what I learned after talking with these guys is that bio resins are really a more refined epoxy resin that is derived either from all plant sources and/or a combination of plant and other sources thus decreasing our reliance on petroleum based compounds. That’s a win-win for everyone.

But the thing that I thought was even more important, especially to us surfers, is that zero or near to zero VOCs are emitted while using the bio product. Having a lower carbon footprint is good and all, but being able to repair my boards without frying my brain is what I am most interested in, and I know you are too.

The reality is that it’s hard to be green and still get what we want at the price that we are comfortable with. I don’t see any of the pros talking about bio resin or promoting how green their boards are. I googled green surfboards and couldn’t find any credible surfboard shapers pushing bio resin or green boards.

Great respect goes out to Fletcher Chouinard for pushing green innovations in his board-building art. He obviously has different DNA than the rest of us, which is evident in his business model of “causing no unnecessary harm.”



With the majority of boards now being built in China and Thailand by non-surfers operating under low or no regulatory guidelines, the likelihood of the industry moving towards bio resin doesn’t seem plausible. Yet, every small step toward a greener lifestyle is a positive expression of a cleaner and healthier future (check out this NASA video if you still think global warming is a myth: http://ow.ly/8EEZB).

You are probably wondering what you can do? I’ve got some ideas. If you are going to buy a ding repair kit, consider the bio alternative. Buy your boards from local shapers, and request that they use epoxy to glass your next board, or go a step further and ask for bio resin.

Support local surfboard shapers like Chouinard and glassers like Greenhouse Glassing who use these greener materials, and educate your friends on the subject. Put your wallet to work, that is how real change takes place.
Josh Mulcoy finds a moment of solitude amidst the rugged landscape. Unpredictable weather, currents and wildlife allow spots like these to remain untouched.
Josh Mulcoy
Josh Mulcoy finds a moment of solitude amidst the rugged landscape. Unpredictable weather, currents and wildlife allow spots like these to remain untouched. I wonder what the ocean looked like back in the day of the Polynesians and Vikings, before our plastic and petroleum-based society? I can’t imagine any Viking rolling up to something like Trash Island in the Pacific or observing early Hawaiians throwing garbage into the lineup at Pipe.

The oceans must have been emerald paradises back then in the Norsemen’s era, as clear and clean as a windless morning barrel in Fiji. I hope that one day, we, as a tribe of surfers, are able to help revive our ocean’s health while living in a responsible and conscientious way on land.

Wherever you can, please consider choosing the eco-alternative—it’s completely up to you.
Complete Kit With Bamboo Glass
 
The Complete Kit (the whole enchilada with eco salsa)

Wave Tribe Wss Complete Kit

Dude, here is what you get in the COMPLETE kit.

FRAME SOLD SEPARATELY (inner board) pick option 1 on order page
One of the mahogany pre-cut frames, this is your surfboard skeleton.

PAULOWNIA PLANKS. (deck)
The correct number of paulownia planks ready to be cut into strips for decking, glue them on and shape them for the deck, paulownia is a light heavy wood and perfect for the deck. (The paulownia wood is shipped as 8" x 1 1/4" X 8' planks ready to be cut into planking strips on a table saw or band saw, or just chew through it with your teeth).

BALSA STICKS. (rails)
The balsa sticks to be cut into strips for forming the rails, this wood is easy to work with and allows you to shape the rails just right. (The balsa sticks measure 1 1/2" x 1 1/2" x 36" ready to be cut into strips for the rails, nose blocks, tail blocks, and/or fin mounts.)

EPOXY RESIN. (protection)
The correct amount of epoxy resin plus the tools and materials you'll need to do a great glassing job.

FIBERGLASS. (eco style)
Our choice of eco-friendly bamboo fiberglass cloth.

FIN KIT. (stability)
Removable or glass on fin kit includes all the installation materials plus your choice of colors.

COMPLETE INSTRUCTIONS. (even your grandma could build it)
A full instruction manual is emailed to you in PDF format when you order. A video included with the bamboo glassing kit details the glassing process. Dude, you only need to buy a little glue and your ready.

ALSO INCLUDED. (how-to pdf and video)
Don't be afraid to glass, we got your back. The glass is eco-friendly bamboo fiberglass cloth, that's how we roll, and comes with a special instruction CD-ROM.

You also get the correct amount of epoxy resin and hardener, as well as cups, mixing sticks, paintbrushes, sand paper, nitrile gloves, squeegee's, tape, pigment, leash cup, and vent.

The best fin setup for your board is included and will be either glass on fins or a fin and fin-box.

The instruction manual covering every step of the build is mailed to you when you order.

Do it.

Go Back To Order Page


Basic Kit (the frame only)

Wave Tribe Wss Wood Surfboard Kit Frame

The basic kit is essentially the frame or skeleton and is delivered "model airplane" style.

You punch out the ribs and assemble the precision interlocking pieces into a frame.

It also includes a full instruction manual that covers every step of the build in detail.

The PDF manual is emailed to you when you order.

KIT DOES NOT INCLUDE wood for the outside planking nor glue, fiberglass, fins, rail wood, and shop supplies like sandpaper---the COMPLETE kit above does have all the goodies (the easy way bro, don't be cheap).

Go Back To Order Page

Eco Chamber Kits
 

All Eco Chamber kits are made from vertical grain poplar and consist of multiple stringers as shown above.

The stringers are cut to exact specifications on our computer controlled CNC machine.

The board is built by gluing either wood or discarded surfboards that have been cut into strips between the stringers.

Once the foam or wood is glued between all the stringers you simply sand until you touch the edge of the stringers and you have the perfect shape.

Like all our kits, the shape can be modified according to user preference.

Chambered Mini SimmonsSTEP ONE.

Starting at the middle stringer you use wood or foam strips to build up the board one layer at a time.

The vertical dowels keep the stringers aligned.

The average width of the wood or foam between the stringers is 1 1/2".

STEP TWO.

Layers are built up until all the right side stringers are glued in place.

Then you repeat the process on the left side and join the two sides.

This board is being built with balsa but an old surfboard cut into strips works great too.



STEP THREE.


Shaping the blank is a snap since you simply plane and sand the board until you just reach the stringers.

STEP FOUR.



Then its just a final sanding and you are ready to glass just like a regular surfboard.

STEP GREEN.


If you want a super green board like the one that won the Best Sustainable Board award you can use one of our "Green" glassing kits. It contains everything you'll need plus a video on how to use the bamboo glassing fabric. The wood shavings make great compost for your garden.
How To Make A Wood Surfboard
 
1) You order your kit here picking the size and style you want.

2) The kits are cut from mahogany on a CNC machine (don't you wish you had one!)
Wood Surf bOrad CNC Machine
3) Your frame kit arrives at your front door in custom package and UPS guy swears at you for the order.
Free Shipping

4) The ribs and spar are punched out and the frame is built just like an airplane wing (remember those?)
Rib Spars
5) The numbered ribs are slipped into notches in the spar.
Wodd Surfboard Frame
6) Ribs and spar are mounted using scrap sticks and a hot melt glue gun (don't sniff the gun bro).
Wood Glue Gun

7) The center strip is critical and is the first one installed. The remaining wood strips are added two at a time.


8) Plastic wrapping film (or clamps) is stretched into a string and looped around and under the ribs to hold the planks tight while the glue dries. Or just get your wife to hold them for a few hours while you go surf.

Clamp Wood Surfboard Together
9) Once deck if finished the frame is extremely rigid, the sticks are snapped off and the glue spots removed.
Snap Wood Surfboard Together
10) Blocks are added at the tail for the fin box and leash cup.
Wood Surf Board Blocks
11) The bottom planks are installed and rough balsa planks on the bottom (or whatever you want).

12) The edges are sanded until the deck and bottom are even.

13) The rails are built up in layers using balsa or other light wood.


14) Send it to the glasser or glass it yourself.


15) Crack a beer, you did a great job!


Hull Design
 

Surfboard Hull Design

I have been wondering about this a lot in Mini Simmons Surfboard design (surfboard design in general)---what is a hull and how does it influence the board and the ride? Keep reading and I'll tell you.

Two factors are at work when a planing surfboard is in motion: 1) the propulsion power, or force, that creates forward motion (the wave dude) and 2) the resistance that opposes it.

When at rest, a surfers weight is borne entirely by the buoyant force. At low speeds every hull acts as a displacement hull, meaning that the buoyant force is mainly responsible for supporting the surfer. As speed increases, hydrodynamic lift increases as well.

In contrast, the buoyant force decreases as the hull lifts out of the water decreasing the displaced volume.

This is the reason that surfboards with lots of rocker need more speed.



The major difference between a planing surfboard hull and a displacement hull is the way in which the surfboard travels through the water.

A displacement hull has a belly, or convex, bottom contour and planing surface.

This design does not ride high on the water like a planing hull, instead plowing through and parting the water.

At high speeds a displacement hull’s tail will sink down lower and lower as a result of the “hole” created in the water as the surfboard moves forward.

A planing hull, on the other hand, will have a flat or concave bottom contour and plane up on top of the water.

The board will almost skim across the water’s surface.

Displacement Hull
Displacement hulls push through the water as they have no hydrodynamic lift, or the surfboard does not rise out of the water as speed increases.



Planing Hull
Planing hulls are designed to run on top of the water at high speeds. To achieve this they typically are very flat at the tail. The hull design (shape) does not limit the maximum attainable speed but does affect the power required for it to get on plane (on top of the water).



Semi-displacement / Semi-planing Hulls Semi-displacement or semi-planing hulls have features of both planing and displacement hulls. They have a maximum hull design speed. Exceeding this speed can result in erratic handling and unstable operation. There is not one hull design characteristic that differentiates semi-displacement from semi-planing hull. The greater the hydrodynamic lift and higher the hull design speed the more likely it will be referred to as a semi-planing hull.



I came across this blog post by Steven Mast of Mast Surfboards and it is an excellent discussion of the topic. "Although the recent fascination with hulls has centered around the Greg Liddle “ modified transitional displacement hulls”, any surfboard can be considered a hull.

There are displacement hulls, planing hulls and as usually is the case, some variant of the two. As soon as you put an edge at the tail of your board you have created a planing hull. The very nature of the release provided by that edge, by definition puts that board into planing mode. It the edge were left soft and round, you still have a displacement hull. Now whether it is a good one of either type is another matter.

Have you ever seen the old footage of guys towing behind motor boats on their logs? As soon as they get going, the tail end of the board starts submarining and they can literally walk to the nose and go. This demonstrates a the principle of displacement hull theory.

A displacement hull has a theoretical hull speed, above which the water actually sucks the hull deeper into the water (I’m simplifying here). Take a sailboat or any other displacement hull and tow it. At anything above the theoretical hull speed, the boat begins to submarine, actually being pulled deeper into the water.

Old, soft edged boards are the same, as are any true displacement hulls being produced today. As soon as you put an edge at the tail, you release the water and the board begins to plane. The modern surfboard, most “hulls” included, balance these principles to achieve the desired effect or feel.

Now I’m sure I’ll get some flak for this, but displacement hulls, by their very nature, are not as fast as planing hulls (editors note: . They may “feel” faster in a section, but without the release, they are constantly dragging more than a sharp edged board would.

Now this is not a bad thing. The feeling of a well balance hull is one of the great pleasures of surfing that most people fail to credit. Surfing one well takes a different approach, especially if you are stepping off a thruster. Single fin riders tend to have an easier time. Another thing I’ll take flak for, and I’m saying it anyway, Greg Liddle did not invent the displacement hull surfboard. He refined it to an amazing degree, made it work in a short package, championing it when it was completely against the trends of the time, but have you ever seen a Weber Foil? Have you ever really looked at almost any board before the mid sixties? All displacement hulls, although arguably not “modified transitional displacement hulls”, whatever that means.

Please don’t take this as me dissing Greg Liddle. On the contrary, I think his boards are brilliant and have been a huge design influence for me. It’s just I get a little frustrated when I here people talk about hull this and hull that, without any understanding of what a hull is."

Some more links about hull design: > Swaylocks Surfers Forum > Surf Science > Shaping Surfboards
Paulowina & Alaia Info
 
Shape Time: 6-8 Hours

I have been shaping foam blanks for over a decade and recently I got bit by the Alaia bug. I got the blank and put it in my shaping bay and with the help of Surfing Green's Alaia Manual (available free anytime you purchase a blank from Wave Tribe) and went to town.

Working with wood is much different that working with foam, yet the basic concepts remain the same. You need to draw the outline, cut out the basic shape, put in the rails, scoop the nose for rocker, and finish the board with multiple grades of sanding and then slap on a protective coat.

I used the electric planner, orbital hand-sander, saw and sandpaper to shape the blank---the orbital sanding being the tool used most. You could do the entire shape with a saw and sanding block but your arms would feel like rubber after.

The Paulowina wood shapes easily, it's a soft wood and the planner mows right though it.

What the hell is Paulowina wood

Indigenous to China, Paulowina has been cultivated for 2000 years. Most species of Paulowina are very fast growing and can reach highest of 30-60 feet in 15 years, growing up to 10-20 feet in one year under idea conditions---it's like the bamboo of trees.

Once the trees are harvested they regenerate from there existing root system earning them the name "Phoenix Tree". That's cool, no? Thus, paulowina has the ability to reclaim ecologically stressed and degenerate patches of land and the root system can penetrate complex soil environments---it's kind of like an eco angel, turning waste land into regenerative forest.

Paulowina is a pale, whitish color and can be grey, light brown or reddish.

Paulowina is great for surfboards because it has a good weight to strength ratio being lighter than hardwood but more durable than balsa. It also absorbs less water than many other types of wood and thus does not need a resin or glass finish making it super ecological---though you could glass it if you wanted. Paulowina boards should be finished with a seed oil to protect it from water absorption and prevent damages from sea salt and the sun.

The board, like anything made of wood, is 100% biodegradable.


What is an Alaia?

Alaia For Sale at Wave Tribe

First of all an Alaia doesn't have any fins.

Secondly, the board is SUPER thin and has no fiberglass or resin. That means its super eco.

The Alaia comes from Hawaii and was part of the Hawaiian surfing heritage, the original boards were between 7-12 feet long, weighed up to 100 pounds and were made from the wood Acacia Koa.

The modern Alaias are MUCH lighter and most are made with Paulowina wood, though you can use other woods if you seal them up with glass.

It's difficult to ride an Alaia, hard to get them on a plane and even more difficult when you get them up (no pune intended). But when you do, they are a blast and will give you the ride of your life.

Alaia is a Basque girl's name meaning joy and happiness, which is exactly how you'll fell when you finish shaping one and then get to ride your very own creation.

Back to Alaia Order Page!

Pick Your Wood Board Kit
 


Wave Tribe WSS Fish5'6" or 9' ECO Chamber Mini Simmons

This board won "Best of Show" in the "Most Sustainable Surfboard" category at The Boardroom International Surf Expo 2012.

ts a planing hull design with parallel rails, twin keel fins, and it literally flies through
the water.

Kits are now available for both the 5'6" Mini Simmons and the 9'0" full-size Simmons style
board. Both built using "eco chamber" build technology!

See this post for directions on how the eco chamber system works.

In the order menu pick Mini Chambered 5'6" or 9' to Check out.


WANT THE CHAMBERED SIMMONS (click here)



Wave Tribe WSS Fish5'6" FAST LUCY FISH

"The Fast Lucy" got her name because she's fast and loose!

She's great in summer surf she'll still crank on head- high days.

If you are making the transition from long-board to short board this is the way to go.

Any number of fins from one to five works.
  • Length: 5’ 6”
  • Width: 21 3/4 in.
  • Nose: 18 1/4 in.
  • Tail: 18 1/4 in.
  • Thickness: 2 1/4 in.
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Fugu Fish5'6" FUGU FISH

"The Fugu Fish" is a high performance fish designed in conjunction with Justin Grover of Liquid Lifestyles in Australia.

Justin loved the Fast Lucy that he built but wanted more performance.

What he and Brad came up with is a lightweight rocket with a dual channeled bottom.

The performance is like a short-board but you still have the benefits of a fish.
  • Length: 5' 6"
  • Width: 20"
  • Nose: 14"
  • Tail: 16 1/2"
  • Thickness: 2 1/2"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Midfish6' MID FISH

"The Midfish" falls right between the Fast Lucy and Kingfish.

Like its two cousins its still fast, loose and fun – just a little longer to accommodate the bigger riders. I think 6' is a good length for a fish, most I ride are between 5'10" and 6'. It's nice to have a little extra board to paddle into waves and get through flat sections
  • Length: 6’ 0”
  • Width: 24 1/4 in.
  • Nose: 20 1/4 in.
  • Tail: 20 1/4 in
  • Thickness:2 1/2 in.
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Midfish6'6" KINGFISH

"The Kingfish" is our largest WSS fish. It was designed for bigger surfers who still like to rip but has been putting down too many cervesas this year.

Still fast, loose and fun (like those chicks you used to date in high school).

This one is big and fat like your . . . well, why continue.

Like the other fish you can build it with any fin combination.
  • Length: 6’ 6”
  • Width: 25 3/4 in.
  • Nose: 21 1/2 in.
  • Tail: 21 1/2 in.
  • Thickness: 2 3/4 in.
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe Wss Toad6'8" The Toad

"The Toad" with its multi channel bottom profile, is a challenge to build but worth the effort. The channels hold a line and will let you crank turns you won't do on any other wood board. The bottom is planked in the usual way but the contoured ribs let you make perfect channels
  • Length: 6' 8"
  • Width: 25 1/4"
  • Nose: 20"
  • Tail: 18"
  • Thickness: 3"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe Wss Driftwood7' Driftwood

"The 7'0" Driftwood" This is the real hot rod of the Driftwood series. It has the speed and agility you expect from a performance hybrid when its built to plan but it can be shortened to 6'6" for an even more radical profile. Choose the fin setup that's best for your style and harden the rails for snappy turns and an edges that hold tight.
  • Length: 7’
  • Width; 22"
  • Nose: 18 3/4"
  • Tail: 16"
  • Thickness: 3"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Chamelon7'6" Chameleon

The 7'6" Chameleon is a high performance surfboard, well, let's say it's a long-board that performs like a short-board. when it's built according to plan it's an egg that lets you make the most of any size surf. But you can put your own spin on it and make it much more, sharpen the nose and tail for more speed or maneuverability.
  • Length: 7’6"
  • Width: 23 1/2"
  • Nose: 17 1/4"
  • Tail: 15 1/2"
  • Thickness: 2 3/4"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe Wss Driftwood8' Driftwood

"The 8'0" Driftwood" 8-foot performance hybrid. This board has enough volume to easily float riders in the 180 pound neighborhood. Te driftwood is a long-board that thinks its a short-board. Its the nose and tail have been narrowed giving sleek lines and awesome speed and maneuverability. You'll be cranking turns you never thought possible on a long-board.
  • Length: 8’ 0”
  • Width: 22"
  • Nose: 15 3/4"
  • Tail: 16"
  • Thickness: 3"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe Wss Mini Mal8'0" Mini Mal

Classic mini Malibu style long-board with its roots in the 60s. Build it with modern rail profile for a great performer or stick with the traditional 50/50 rails for that sweet paddling nostalgic feel. The Mini Mal is a perfect starter board for the younger surfers but is also fun for the experienced rider and makes a great transitional board.
  • Length: 8’ 0”
  • Width: 24"
  • Nose: 21 3/4"
  • Tail: 15 1/4"
  • Thickness: 2 3/4"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe Wss Driftwood8'1" Driftwood Sr.

"The 8'1" Driftwood Sr." 8-foot performance hybrid that we widened a little for better flotation and stability. Designed for riders in the 200+ pound area. Same sleek lines and awesome speed and maneuverability as the Driftwood, just floats more. You'll be cranking turns you never thought possible on a long-board.
  • Length: 8’ 1”
  • Width: 24 3/4"
  • Nose: 21 1/4"
  • Tail: 18 1/2"
  • Thickness: 3 1/4"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Chamelon8'6" Chameleon

The 8'6" Chameleon is a high performance surfboard, well, let's say it's a long-board that performs like a short-board. when it's built according to plan it's an egg that lets you make the most of any size surf. But you can put your own spin on it and make it much more, sharpen the nose and tail for more speed or maneuverability.
  • Length: 8’6"
  • Width: 23 1/2"
  • Nose: 17 1/4"
  • Tail: 15 1/2"
  • Thickness: 2 3/4"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Robert August9'0" The Robert August

The Robert August is the board that Robert August uses himself around the world during his surf travels. This board can do it all from powerful carving 360s off the tail to great nose rides. This board features a moderate width nose with a nose concave underneath for extra lift while nose riding. 60/40 rails let it will paddle nicely and still crank turns at will.
  • Length: 9’ 0”
  • Width: 24"
  • Nose: 21 3/4"
  • Tail: 15 1/4"
  • Thickness: 2 3/4"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Crusier9'0" Cruiser

The 9'0" Cruiser is a slightly shortened and trimmed down version of the Original Cruiser. We took 6" off the length and narrowed the nose 1/4". You'll get even more performance out of this classic long-board shape. Its still got just enough rocker to be forgiving on late takeoffs but still has speed down the line. Be prepared to spend some serious nose time with this board.
  • Length: 9’ 0”
  • Width: 22 1/4"
  • Nose: 18 1/4"
  • Tail: 16"
  • Thickness: 3 1/4"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Robert August9'6" The Robert August

The Robert August is the board that Robert August uses himself around the world during his surf travels. This board can do it all from powerful carving 360s off the tail to great nose rides. This board features a moderate width nose with a nose concave underneath for extra lift while nose riding. 60/40 rails let it will paddle nicely and still crank turns at will.
  • Length: 9’6”
  • Width: 24"
  • Nose: 21 3/4"
  • Tail: 15 1/4"
  • Thickness: 2 3/4"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Crusier9'6" Cruiser

The original Curiser was inspired by the great long-boards of the 60s Build it with retro 50-50 rails for that sweet turns on a dime and hugs a wave tight. Its got just enough rocker to be forgiving on late takeoffs but still has speed down the line. Be prepared to spend some serious nose time with this board.
  • Length: 9’ 6”
  • Width: 22 1/2"
  • Nose: 18 1/4"
  • Tail: 16"
  • Thickness: 3 1/4"
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.


Wave Tribe WSS Gordo10' Gordo

"The Gordo" is our original "Big Boy Board". . But just because its big doesn't mean it's clumsy. The rails have been pinched slightly to give it agility and performance.
  • Length: 10’ 0”
  • Width: 23 3/4"
  • Nose: 19 1/2"
  • Tail: 15"
  • Thickness: 3 3/8 in.
This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.



DIY SUP Wood Kit11' Malco SUP

"The Malco 11 foot SUP was designed by Malcolm Schweizer in St. Thomas, Virgin Islands. It has a little concave in the nose and a slight "V" in the tail. Plus the new rib design lets you build the rails two different ways (built up solid rails or wood strip hollow rails.
  • Length: 11’ 0”
  • Width: 30 3/4"
  • Nose: 23 1/2"
  • Tail: 19"
  • Thickness: 4 1/4" in.

A SUP needs to have good hull speed for "flat-out" paddling but needs to have the ability to plane for surfing. The Malco was designed to achieve both these goals. You can paddle fast for long distances, but still be able to easily surf once you are there. It is designed with paddling in mind - its not just a big surfboard that comes with a paddle.

This Kit contains a complete frame consisting of ribs and main spar (stringer) as well as an electronic assembly manual covering every step.

You will need wood for the outside planking, fiberglass, glue, sandpaper and common tools to complete the kit, unless you get the complete kits that's got it all.



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