Four Things To Do With Your Unwanted Surfboard

by Derek Dodds September 28, 2016

Four Things To Do With Your Unwanted Surfboard

I love buying surfboards, and when the editors at Deep told me that this was the Board Buyers issue I got as excited as a Mick Fanning shark attack (sorry, I had too), We all love that feeling of new foam under our feet and it’s likely the thing we talk about most with our bros while drinking beer and reminiscing about all those waves we caught down in Costa Rica last season.

As I was envisioning all the rad boards I would see in this issue, I started to reflect on my own quiver and how it has changed over the years. I have been surfing for over three decades and my surfboard fetish has gone through a myriad of transitions. I tend to like trying new designs and have found myself leading a small revolution in the Mini Simmons world—I even wrote a book on the Mini Simmons called Keel Nation.

Speaking of new shapes, a few months back I bought a Vulcan surfboard from the San Diego shaper Dane Hantz. Dan’s boards have won Best High Performance Shortboard Design for both 2013 and 2014 at the Boardroom. As you can imagine, I had to try one. I have been riding The Archetype which is a planing hull concept. Dan describes his shape, “The Archetypes ultra low rocker has been slightly raised while the straight rail line and fuller foil and rails still provide the hull speed necessary to slip into the realm of those longboard only days.” The fat tail is mini-esque, but the rest of it the board feels like a shortboard on steroids on those days when even my Mini would be struggling—bravo Dan. Overall, it is a great hybrid design that deserves a go in our semi-consistent mushy waves in Southern California.

I digress, this article isn't about surfboard design, it's an inquiry into what you could do with your estranged surfboard once you have finished using it. The goal is not to have that board end up in some landfill in Riverside County—not that we care what happens in Riverside, but we do care what happens to the crap you throw out, and how that affects our precious planet.

The most intelligent thing to do with your unwanted surfboard is to sell it to someone else that does want it. This is a classic win-win situation—you get cash to help fund your surf trip to that new wave park being built in Austin, Texas. Simultaneously, your sled ends up in the hands of someone that will shepherd it into the next northwest swell season. You can make a free listing on craigslist.org to sell your surfboard in the sporting goods section or take it down to your local surf shop and offer them a small commission for placing your board almost their rightious racks.

If you can't sell it, you can gift it to a local kid that needs a new board—giving is way underrated.

Four Things to do with your Unwanted Surfboard When you see that kid in the line-up, he and all his friends will let you take all the waves you want because you actually did something good and that karma will pay its dividends when you least expect it.

You can also donate your board to a Big Boys/Girls Club or something like that. If you are going the donation route check out Rerip.com which collects any surfboard in any condition. Many boards donated to Rerip are repaired to be surfed again and other surfboards are given to artists to create awesome art.

Another idea is that you could strip the fiberglass off your stick (assuming it’s a longbaord-ish type of surfboard) and create a Mini Simmons or single fin. Shape your first board from repurposed material—that is an eco rad idea for sure.

The last idea I have is to make a surfboard table for the backyard, bar or sign for your business. To create a table, glass a few wood legs on that bad-boy and throw some chairs around it for an epic-ly artistic rendition of patio furniture. Put a bar in the garage by using the surfboard deck as a shelving unit—you can glue it straight to the wall or use some shelving brackets to secure it. Got a business? Make a side-walk sign out of your old surfboard by creating a chalkboard from the deck. Home Depot sells chalkboard paint that will transform any surface into a usable chalkboard.

The most important thing to realize is that your old board has some potential afterlife opportunities once it has become unwanted foam and fiberglass. Find a creative way to prevent it from being buried in the earth. It should not be left for the walking dead to use once the zombies make their comeback—we all know zombies are kooks and nobody wants to see them in the lineup on your old surfboard.

——————

Derek Dodds is the founder of Wave Tribe and can be found floating amongst the dolphins around Ventura county or you can reach him via email derek@wavetribe.com or hit him up on twitter/instagram/facebook @wavetribe

 




Derek Dodds
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Wave Tribe Social Proof
Size Chart

Surfboard Leashes

You Break It We Replace It in First Year. 

Buy a leash closest to your board size—i.e. for 6'4 surfboard you need a 6' leash. 

All leashes are 7mm thick, competition leashes which are lighter/thinner 5.5 mm. 

Pioneer Day Boardbags - Fits One Surfboard

All boardbags have +2 inches. Thus a 6'6 board fit's perfectly in a 6'6 boardbag. All Pioneer bags have expandable fin gussets, so you can keep your fins on your board in the bag—or you can roll with glass-on fins.

Pioneer Sizes:

All bags have interior pockets (fins, leash and wax), bags fit industry standards. 

Our 8'6, 9'6 and 10' bags have fin slots and round noses. 

Pioneer bags also have an exterior pocket and zip all the way to the nose.

Travel Bags - Fits Two Surfboards

All Global boardbags have +2 inches, so if you buy a 6'2 boardbag, the real length is 6'4—thus you have a bit of room to play. 

Global Travel Bag Sizes:

Travel boardbags are 6'-8' inches deep to accommodate two boards—though you can travel with one in these bags without a problem—there are two interior pockets for leash, wax, and fins.

Surfboard Travel Bag Pockets Fin Wax Leash

Travel boardbags have two padded boards separators and two pockets for your gear. 

* Travel boardbags also have 13mm + 13mm of extra padding in the nose and tail.

Travel Bags with Wheels - Fits Two Surfboards

New in 2016 is the double travel bag with wheels. Sometimes you want a smaller bag with wheels, now you can have it. All Global boardbags have +2 inches, so if you buy a 6'2 boardbag, the real length is 6'4—thus you have a bit of room to play. 

Global Travel Bag Sizes:

Travel boardbags are 6'-8' inches deep to accommodate two boards—though you can travel with one in these bags without a problem—there are two interior pockets for leash, wax, and fins.

Wave Tribe Wheelie Surfboard Travel Bags

Travel boardbags have two padded boards separators and two pockets for your gear. 

* Travel boardbags also have 13mm + 13mm of extra padding in the nose and tail.

Boardbag Material & Hardware - All Bags

Side A of the bag is made from a strong density Rugged Eco Hemp exterior which is one tough fiber and naturally built to last with high impact padding protection with Rebound Foam Dynamics including open-to-nose technology.

Side B is the reflective (rental-car-roof-side) made from Reflective Energy Shield for "Cooler Surfboard Safeguard" protecting your surfboard from the sun's harmful rays made from an alloy-steel mesh weave.

All Sides are guarded by our Japanese Never-Rust-or-Break Nickel Platted Zippers streamline zipper trails and our trademarked Easy Flow Zip System.