Four Things You Can Do To Prevent The Growth Of The Great Pacific Garbage Patch

by Derek Dodds July 22, 2016

Our ocean is becoming a trash receptacle—yea, that majestic blanket of love that propels you into delightful moments of surfing ecstasy could be (or already is in some places) nothing more than a liquid dump.

It doesn’t sound too appetizing does it?

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predicted The Great Pacific Garbage Patch back in 1988, but unfortunately that prediction fell on deaf ears and society continued to dump garbage in the ocean at alarming rates.

Four Things You Can Do To Prevent The Growth of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch

When I first heard about The Great Pacific Garbage Patch (TGPGP) I imagined an island of trash floating aimlessly in some remote area of the Pacific—but as I found out, that image is flawed. In fact, you can’t even see much of the TGPGP because it is made up of tons of tiny plastic particles that are a result of asphotodegradation—a process of partial degradation caused by sunlight.

Here is the raw deal, plastic is not biodegradable and as those plastic pieces break into tiny particles they cause environmental havoc on the marine eco system. Fish, birds and marine mammals ingest much of the plastic which can rupture their organs or cause starvation.

However, the most fundamental issue is caused by microplastics near the surface of the ocean which block sunlight from reaching plankton and algae below. If this necessary part of the marine environment is challenged in any sufficient way, marine life will disappear in large numbers from the smallest fish to the largest animal on the planet—the blue whale. Without plankton the entire marine ecosystem would collapse.

Here are four things you can do today to help reduce the trash in the ocean:

1) Stop using plastic—or reduce it in every aspect of your life. No plastic water bottles, no plastic bags (always use paper when possible) no plastic packaging, just say no—to plastic.

2) Stop eating ocean harvested fish—yep, the majority of TGPGP, about 705,000 tons, comes from lost, broken or discarded fishing nets. I know this is going to be a hard one, but of all the things you could do it would be the most impactful.

3) Participate in beach clean-ups and pick trash off the ground when you see it. If we prevent trash from entering the ocean and waterways we have a fighting chance to help reduce the future growth of TGPGP.

4) Support Algalita Marine Research Foundation—created by Charles Moore, the man who discovered the TGPGP in 1997. Algalita’s mission is to the protection and improvement of the marine environment and its watersheds through research and education on the impacts of plastic pollution. Moore’s foundation is our best hope of finding a solution to TGPGP.

Wishing you a responsible journey ahead—as surfers we must stand up for the health of our oceans, imagine what it has given us in this life, it’s time to give back.




Derek Dodds
Derek Dodds

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Wave Tribe Social Proof
Size Chart

Surfboard Leashes

You Break It We Replace It in First Year. 

Buy a leash closest to your board size—i.e. for 6'4 surfboard you need a 6' leash. 

All leashes are 7mm thick, competition leashes which are lighter/thinner 5.5 mm. 

Pioneer Day Boardbags - Fits One Surfboard

All boardbags have +2 inches. Thus a 6'6 board fit's perfectly in a 6'6 boardbag. All Pioneer bags have expandable fin gussets, so you can keep your fins on your board in the bag—or you can roll with glass-on fins.

Pioneer Sizes:

All bags have interior pockets (fins, leash and wax), bags fit industry standards. 

Our 8'6, 9'6 and 10' bags have fin slots and round noses. 

Pioneer bags also have an exterior pocket and zip all the way to the nose.

Travel Bags - Fits Two Surfboards

All Global boardbags have +2 inches, so if you buy a 6'2 boardbag, the real length is 6'4—thus you have a bit of room to play. 

Global Travel Bag Sizes:

Travel boardbags are 6'-8' inches deep to accommodate two boards—though you can travel with one in these bags without a problem—there are two interior pockets for leash, wax, and fins.

Surfboard Travel Bag Pockets Fin Wax Leash

Travel boardbags have two padded boards separators and two pockets for your gear. 

* Travel boardbags also have 13mm + 13mm of extra padding in the nose and tail.

Travel Bags with Wheels - Fits Two Surfboards

New in 2016 is the double travel bag with wheels. Sometimes you want a smaller bag with wheels, now you can have it. All Global boardbags have +2 inches, so if you buy a 6'2 boardbag, the real length is 6'4—thus you have a bit of room to play. 

Global Travel Bag Sizes:

Travel boardbags are 6'-8' inches deep to accommodate two boards—though you can travel with one in these bags without a problem—there are two interior pockets for leash, wax, and fins.

Wave Tribe Wheelie Surfboard Travel Bags

Travel boardbags have two padded boards separators and two pockets for your gear. 

* Travel boardbags also have 13mm + 13mm of extra padding in the nose and tail.

Boardbag Material & Hardware - All Bags

Side A of the bag is made from a strong density Rugged Eco Hemp exterior which is one tough fiber and naturally built to last with high impact padding protection with Rebound Foam Dynamics including open-to-nose technology.

Side B is the reflective (rental-car-roof-side) made from Reflective Energy Shield for "Cooler Surfboard Safeguard" protecting your surfboard from the sun's harmful rays made from an alloy-steel mesh weave.

All Sides are guarded by our Japanese Never-Rust-or-Break Nickel Platted Zippers streamline zipper trails and our trademarked Easy Flow Zip System.