BOARDSOCK GIVEAWAY

by Derek Dodds September 16, 2018

Wave Tribe

Hey, remember that Weezer song Surf Wax America? It never landed on the Billboard 100, but it was included in their debut studio album in 1994.

Published by Wave Tribe

The album, by the way, later reached a quadruple-platinum status in America.

That song is an underrated classic. A music review called it the anti-work anthem that embraces the Californian spirit of finding what you love and dedicating your life to it. If you’re not a surfer, you won’t really get it but nothing represents the American surfing lifestyle more than surfboard wax.

So it isn’t surprising that the consumer demand for surfing wax is widespread.

Industry estimates show that global revenue from the surfing industry is at $22 billion.

In America alone, around $8 billion is generated from the sale of surfing lifestyle merchandise.

One of the more established brands, Sticky Bumps, says that their surfing wax generates most of their company’s profit and revenues. It’s such a small and low-key product but it also happens to be an important arsenal in a surfer’s toolbox.

Unfortunately though, there is a toxic side to the surfboard wax.

What is a Surfing Wax?

Ever since it was introduced in 1935, the surfing board wax has been a mainstay in the surfing scene. It’s a reliable coating for surfing boards because it’s sticky and yet it repels water. Since no self-respecting surfer dude would be caught knocked off his feet while attempting to ride a wave, the wax became an essential component in any surfing kit.

The surfing wax is rubbed into the top part, otherwise known as the deck, of the surfing board. The rubbing motion slightly melts the wax so that it sticks to the board’s surface. Some surfers add a basecoat layer of wax to newly bought surfing boards to make the normal wax stick better to the surfing board.

Its Dark Side

The earliest bars of surfing board wax were made of paraffin. A lot of research and development has been done since then and today’s surfing waxes now have other substances mixed into the paraffin base in order to make it more marketable to surfers. So you have a merry mix of waxes jostling for your attention on the store shelf; there’s coconut scented surfing wax, and there is a shark repellant surfing wax- although the jury is still out on that one.

But still, paraffin is used as the main ingredient.

The problem with paraffin is that it is a by-product of petroleum. This means that in order to make paraffin, you have to process petroleum first. And we know how environmentally destructive petroleum processing technologies are.

Some of these are benzene and toluene which have been determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as probable human carcinogens.Considering that about 95% of surfing waxes in the global market contain these petroleum by-products, this is a very alarming.

— Derek Dodds, Wave Tribe Founder

Toxic Wax?

A lot of toxic chemicals are used to produce paraffin for the consumer market. The substance, which starts out as grayish-black sludge, undergoes a bleaching process that emits dioxins. Now dioxins are very toxic chemicals which cause reproductive and developmental damages and cancer to those exposed to it. It also does not biodegrade, so it can remain in the environment as a toxic pollutant for years.

After the bleaching process, the white ooze is then further processed by adding chemicals which solidify the substance into solid paraffin. The most common chemical used is acrolyn which also causes cancer.

By the time the surfing wax bar has reached commercial stores, it will have contained additional toxic petrochemical by-products. Some of these are benzene and toluene which have been determined by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as probable human carcinogens.

Considering that about 95% of surfing waxes in the global market contain these petroleum by-products, this is a very alarming.

Not only will it have a significant risk on the health of surfers, but it will also pollute the ocean since the wax will eventually degrade off a surfboard, and enter the marine ecosystem.

What are the Alternatives?

In response to the growing movement for more responsible surfing, there are several market initiatives which sell organic and eco-friendly natural waxes. These companies steer away from using petrochemical-based products. Nor do these use synthetic additives for color and smell.

These come under assorted labels: all-vegan surfing wax, organic surf wax, and are endorsed by eco-organizations such as People for the Treatment of Ethical Animals (PETA).

Or you can Do It Yourself

If you don’t want to spend any more than you should, you can also make your own sustainable and petroleum-free surfing wax.

Simply substitute paraffin for beeswax and tree resin and add coconut oil to make it smell nice and tropical. For more details, you can check out this recipe.

Minimizing your Carbon Footprints in the Water

As surfers, we need to make every effort to lessen our negative impact on the places that we visit. In early years, surfers got a lot of flack from the general public because not only are we thought of as irresponsible slackers, but also toxic ones because of the number of toxins that we carry around through our equipment and the gear that we wear.

We wear wetsuits made of neoprene, a petrochemical by-product. We ride the waves with petroleum-derived polyurethane surfboards. We coat these boards with paraffin extracted from petroleum. We burn fossil fuel when searching the next best places to surf.

And when we’re done with our gear, we easily throw them away, endangering not only others but also a marine environment already plagued with a massive plastic pollution problem.

Here at Wave Tribe, we try to minimize our negative impact on the environment by creating surfing products that do not add more harm to the environment. Things like natural hemp surfboard traveling bags, bio resin surfboards and of course, our eco-surf wax.

Our Eco-Surf Wax Rocks!

We’re particularly proud of our organic surf wax because it provides more friction than the usual, every day surfing wax variety.

How do we know that? Because we put it into a test.

And hands down, the Wave Tribe Eco Wax solidly beat Sticky Bumps.

It’s things like this that shows us we are on a positive path. Doing it this way, with organically sourced materials and sustainable, eco-friendly processes, we continue to create a symbiotic relationship between surfing as a sport and the ocean as our playing ground.

Want to surf green? Try out our Eco Wax. Click here to check out our product.
 

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Derek Dodds
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Size Chart

Surfboard Leashes

You Break It We Replace It in First Year. 

Buy a leash closest to your board size—i.e. for 6'4 surfboard you need a 6' leash. 

All leashes are 7mm thick, competition leashes which are lighter/thinner 5.5 mm. 

Pioneer Day Boardbags - Fits One Surfboard

All boardbags have +2 inches. Thus a 6'6 board fit's perfectly in a 6'6 boardbag. All Pioneer bags have expandable fin gussets, so you can keep your fins on your board in the bag—or you can roll with glass-on fins.

Pioneer Sizes:

All bags have interior pockets (fins, leash and wax), bags fit industry standards. 

Our 8'6, 9'6 and 10' bags have fin slots and round noses. 

Pioneer bags also have an exterior pocket and zip all the way to the nose.

Travel Bags - Fits Two Surfboards

All Global boardbags have +2 inches, so if you buy a 6'2 boardbag, the real length is 6'4—thus you have a bit of room to play. 

Global Travel Bag Sizes:

Travel boardbags are 6'-8' inches deep to accommodate two boards—though you can travel with one in these bags without a problem—there are two interior pockets for leash, wax, and fins.

Surfboard Travel Bag Pockets Fin Wax Leash

Travel boardbags have two padded boards separators and two pockets for your gear. 

* Travel boardbags also have 13mm + 13mm of extra padding in the nose and tail.

Travel Bags with Wheels - Fits Two Surfboards

New in 2016 is the double travel bag with wheels. Sometimes you want a smaller bag with wheels, now you can have it. All Global boardbags have +2 inches, so if you buy a 6'2 boardbag, the real length is 6'4—thus you have a bit of room to play. 

Global Travel Bag Sizes:

Travel boardbags are 6'-8' inches deep to accommodate two boards—though you can travel with one in these bags without a problem—there are two interior pockets for leash, wax, and fins.

Wave Tribe Wheelie Surfboard Travel Bags

Travel boardbags have two padded boards separators and two pockets for your gear. 

* Travel boardbags also have 13mm + 13mm of extra padding in the nose and tail.

Boardbag Material & Hardware - All Bags

Side A of the bag is made from a strong density Rugged Eco Hemp exterior which is one tough fiber and naturally built to last with high impact padding protection with Rebound Foam Dynamics including open-to-nose technology.

Side B is the reflective (rental-car-roof-side) made from Reflective Energy Shield for "Cooler Surfboard Safeguard" protecting your surfboard from the sun's harmful rays made from an alloy-steel mesh weave.

All Sides are guarded by our Japanese Never-Rust-or-Break Nickel Platted Zippers streamline zipper trails and our trademarked Easy Flow Zip System.