Free Shipping On All Orders Over $50 - 805.874.2335 - Share The Stoke

Why Organic Cotton Undies Are Better For Your Unit

by Derek Dodds January 01, 2016

Most of us use it—in fact, your private parts are likely touching it right now as you read these words. Those parts, precious as they are, deserve a wholesome home.

You probably even sleep next to cotton, either in your PJs or while wrapped up in those floral stain sheets that you bought before your last date.

Oh yea, how about that rip curl t-shirt that you are wearing, that's likely cotton too—most modern day boardbags are make with a thick cotton outer shell, so even your surfboard is chilling in a cotton castle.

Cotton covers 2.5% of the world’s cultivated land, yet uses 16% of the world’s insecticides, more than any other single major crop.

Wait, let’s let that sink in . . .

Cotton is considered the world’s ‘dirtiest’ crop due to its heavy use of insecticides. Insecticides (or chemicals that cause major harm to you and the planet) are the most hazardous pesticides to human and animal health.

Pesticides used in the production of conventional cotton include orthophosphates such as phorate and methamidophos, endosulfan (highly toxic to farmers, but not very environmentally persistent) and aldicarb.[12] Other pesticides persisting in cotton fields in the United States include Trifluralin, Toxaphene and DDT.

Ever wonder what that smell was while you were surfing after the rain?

None of those weird sounding words are good for you bro—if there are any crops around where you surf that means those chemicals are running off the land straight into your home break and seeping into underground freshwater reserves, rivers, lakes and oceans.

We won't even talk about what happens across the border where environmental restrictions are more lax, or where a stack of cash can make an inspector look the other way.

Those gnarly chemicals might be touching your skin at this very moment.

Ok, I know what you are thinking—can you wash conventional fabrics to remove all the toxic residues?

I got bad news: gas chromatography shows that common pesticides used on cotton crops are found in the fibers and with time, as the cotton fibers degrade, these residual chemicals are released.

Cotton is also food.

If you’re trying to avoid pesticides which are applied to cotton crops, you’d do better to avoid cottonseed oil than the fiber (if processed conventionally), because we eat more of the cotton crop than we wear.

Now that we understand that the chemicals are not washed out of the fabrics, our next question is, how do these chemicals get into our bodies from the textiles?

Skin and air.

Our skin is the largest organ of our body, and it’s highly permeable. Some call skin the organ of protection, but it cannot fight off the toxicity of harsh pesticides.

Inhalation of the chemicals as they evaporate is the other way the insidious particles get inside us. These microscopic particles fly into the air and then we breathe them in or ingest them. Or they fall into the dust of our homes, where people and pets, especially crawling children and pets, continue to breathe or ingest them. No wonder your cat is looking at you funny.

All right, now you think I am going to hit you over the head with a spiel about organic cotton and try and persuade you to the light side of the eco Force.

More bad news, the chemicals used in conventionally processed organic cotton fabrics are more gnarly than the chemicals used to grow non-organic cotton.

Yep—there are over two thousand different kinds of chemicals used in textile production, many of them so toxic that they are outlawed in other products. This toxic production bath is used on both organic and non-organic fibers.

Growing the fiber is just the first step in the weaving and finishing of a fabric before it goes to market and ends up at your local surf shop. Some experts estimate that it takes 12.5 pounds of processing chemicals to produce 25 pounds of cloth and five pounds of pesticides, fertilizers and insecticides to grow the same amount of fiber.

If you are going to buy an organic cotton product, there are eco experts that claim those products must be third party certified by the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). The GOTS stipulates requirements throughout the supply chain for both ecology and labor conditions in textile and apparel manufacturing using organically produced raw materials.

I don't know about these organic certifiers, sometimes it just seems like another racket to get people to pay money to get the certification. GOTS charges people 120 Euros to use their logo and get certified—I guess that's not too expensive.

What is the answer here regarding cotton: buy organic, buy GOTS organic, don't buy organic and just go with it?

If you really want to go organic my best advice is to join a nudist colony, avoid cottonseed oil, and surf naked whenever you can—with extra sun protection.





Derek Dodds
Derek Dodds

Author


Leave a comment

Comments will be approved before showing up.


Also in Eco

Four Things To Do With Your Unwanted Surfboard
Four Things To Do With Your Unwanted Surfboard

by Derek Dodds September 28, 2016

I love buying surfboards, and when the editors at Deep told me that this was the Board Buyers issue I got as excited as a Mick Fanning shark attack (sorry, I had too), We all love that feeling of new foam under our feet and it’s likely the thing we talk about most with our bros while drinking beer and reminiscing about all those waves we caught down in Costa Rica last season.

Continue Reading →

The Coming Bee-Pocalypse?
The Coming Bee-Pocalypse?

by Derek Dodds September 10, 2016

Our growing concerns about the Zika, West Nile, and other mosquito-borne viruses have led to the institution of mosquito control programs in many town and cities in the U.S. One effective means of eliminating adult mosquitoes is aerial spraying with an organophosphate pesticide called Naled. Unfortunately, there’s been collateral damage to many beneficial insects; the honeybee is one of them.

Continue Reading →

Sea Turtles Guardians of the Sea
Sea Turtles Guardians of the Sea

by Derek Dodds August 21, 2016

The image of the green turtle (Chelonia mydas), or honu, can be found everywhere in surf style and communities. The green sea turtle is the only indigenous reptile to the Hawaiian Islands and is a revered symbol of the ocean interwoven with much of the islands’ folklore.

Continue Reading →

Wave Tribe Social Proof
Size Chart

Surfboard Leashes

You Break It We Replace It in First Year. 

Buy a leash closest to your board size—i.e. for 6'4 surfboard you need a 6' leash. 

All leashes are 7mm thick, competition leashes which are lighter/thinner 5.5 mm. 

Pioneer Day Boardbags - Fits One Surfboard

All boardbags have +2 inches. Thus a 6'6 board fit's perfectly in a 6'6 boardbag. All Pioneer bags have expandable fin gussets, so you can keep your fins on your board in the bag—or you can roll with glass-on fins.

Pioneer Sizes:

All bags have interior pockets (fins, leash and wax), bags fit industry standards. 

Our 8'6, 9'6 and 10' bags have fin slots and round noses. 

Pioneer bags also have an exterior pocket and zip all the way to the nose.

Travel Bags - Fits Two Surfboards

All Global boardbags have +2 inches, so if you buy a 6'2 boardbag, the real length is 6'4—thus you have a bit of room to play. 

Global Travel Bag Sizes:

Travel boardbags are 6'-8' inches deep to accommodate two boards—though you can travel with one in these bags without a problem—there are two interior pockets for leash, wax, and fins.

Surfboard Travel Bag Pockets Fin Wax Leash

Travel boardbags have two padded boards separators and two pockets for your gear. 

* Travel boardbags also have 13mm + 13mm of extra padding in the nose and tail.

Travel Bags with Wheels - Fits Two Surfboards

New in 2016 is the double travel bag with wheels. Sometimes you want a smaller bag with wheels, now you can have it. All Global boardbags have +2 inches, so if you buy a 6'2 boardbag, the real length is 6'4—thus you have a bit of room to play. 

Global Travel Bag Sizes:

Travel boardbags are 6'-8' inches deep to accommodate two boards—though you can travel with one in these bags without a problem—there are two interior pockets for leash, wax, and fins.

Wave Tribe Wheelie Surfboard Travel Bags

Travel boardbags have two padded boards separators and two pockets for your gear. 

* Travel boardbags also have 13mm + 13mm of extra padding in the nose and tail.

Boardbag Material & Hardware - All Bags

Side A of the bag is made from a strong density Rugged Eco Hemp exterior which is one tough fiber and naturally built to last with high impact padding protection with Rebound Foam Dynamics including open-to-nose technology.

Side B is the reflective (rental-car-roof-side) made from Reflective Energy Shield for "Cooler Surfboard Safeguard" protecting your surfboard from the sun's harmful rays made from an alloy-steel mesh weave.

All Sides are guarded by our Japanese Never-Rust-or-Break Nickel Platted Zippers streamline zipper trails and our trademarked Easy Flow Zip System.